Développement du secteur Fairview

Vaste développement de type TOD* des abords de la futur station Fairview-Pointe-Claire du REM et du centre commercial du même nom.

Informations

Nom:
Emplacement: Station Fairview–Pointe-Claire
Hauteur:

Architecte:
Promoteur: Cadillac Fairview
Début et fin de la construction:

Autres informations:

  • Plan d’aménagement du secteur à proximité de la nouvelle station Fairview–Pointe-Claire du REM

Sources des informations:
Autres images:

CF unveils 5M-sq.-ft. ‘downtown’ in Montreal’s West Island

RENX.ca - Real Estate News EXchange | Danny Kucharsky (Commercial - Residential) | Oct. 14, 2020

Montreal_REMPointeClaire400jpeg
Cadillac Fairview has just announced plans for a new “downtown” in the West Island district of Pointe-Claire, around a new REM light-rail station and connected to its CF Fairview Pointe Claire shopping centre. (Courtesy CF)

Cadillac Fairview will build a new downtown of about five million square feet in Montreal’s West Island, on land west of its existing CF Fairview Pointe Claire mall in Pointe-Claire.

The massive development will include office and residential towers, 5,000 residential units, a seniors residence, a boutique hotel, parks and retail, all of which will be centred by a new REM light-rail transit station and bus terminus.

“The only thing the West Island doesn’t have is a downtown and that’s where we come in,” said Brian Salpeter, senior vice-president, development, Eastern Canada portfolio at Cadillac Fairview.

Although Pointe-Claire is in the heart of the West Island, “what we’re creating is the downtown for the entire West Island, not just Pointe-Claire.”

Salpeter unveiled details of the proposed new downtown in a session discussing the West Island during the Montreal Real Estate Forum, held online Oct. 6 and 7.

Cadillac Fairview’s “very ambitious” plan

The goal is to create a “very ambitious” dense, multi-use centre that responds to the needs of the West Island community, he said. “We’re not coming in and building something which is foreign and unknown to this community.”

Cadillac Fairview has been in the area for 55 years; it developed CF Fairview Pointe Claire in 1965 and has invested hundreds of millions of dollars over the years in expansions and renovations.

The enclosed mall with about a million square feet of retail space and 175 retailers “continues to be the economic hub and really the focal point of the entire area. Now we’re moving on to the next phase.”

Salpeter described the project as an “urban core in a suburban setting” with mixed-uses including residential, office and entertainment.

He did not provide a timeline, nor a cost estimate for the multi-phase project. It will be built in an area that encompasses the westbound service road of Highway 40 (Trans-Canada Highway), Saint-Jean Boulevard, Brunswick Boulevard and Fairview Avenue.

Large Pointe-Claire land assembly

Much of the project will be built on what Cadillac Fairview calls the John Abbott College Lands. The 50-acre site was once earmarked for the college but it instead opted to settle further west in Sainte-Anne de Bellevue on the West Island.

Cadillac Fairview acquired the land in 2013 when it “saw the synergies and the potential for the entire site.”

He did not divulge the acquisition cost, aside from noting it was more than $5 per square foot. That parcel of land alone will give Cadillac Fairview about two million square feet of buildable area.

Another part of the project includes land Cadillac Fairview bought in 2016 housing a Réno-Dépôt big box home improvement store off Fairview Avenue, which still has a lease in place.

Phase 1 of the project involves the redevelopment of the former Sears store, which is currently being transformed into a two-level Simons department store and food court at a cost of more than $100 million. The Simons store is scheduled to open next summer.

Simons is “a great retailer which has really come through the pandemic in terms of their operations,” Salpeter said. “They’ve done a superb job in terms of how they’ve really been able to manage and adapt to the situation.

“So we’re very excited to bring what will be a Simons flagship that will serve the entire West Island and beyond.”

The new food court will include terraces and become a focal point not just for the mall but for the development, he said. A public plaza will connect the food court and the rest of the development.

REM station at heart of development

A REM station and bus terminus will be located at the centre of the development, making it a true transit-oriented development, he said.

“We worked very hard to locate that REM station in the ideal zone to really be able to benefit everybody who’s going to be here in terms of residential and office,” Salpeter said.

He added there is an opportunity to create “a great office campus” that “will be the meat in the sandwich” of the project.

“We can go anywhere from 600,000 to a million square feet, depending on what the market wants.”

Salpeter said the project does not face any density restrictions. The only height restrictions are from Trudeau International Airport, “but nothing that would actually impact us in terms of what we want to build.”

Phase 2 of the project will include offices to be built in the mixed-use Secteur Centre-ville of the project, which will also include hotel and residential.

Plans include a 150-room boutique hotel built over eight floors, a 21-storey seniors residence with 400 units and rental towers of 10 floors with each containing 150 to 200 units.

Residential phase to follow

Phase 3 will see the first full residential phase. Many of the residential units will be built in the Secteur du Parc. There will be a mix of condominiums, rental units, high-rise and mid-rise buildings, townhouses and stacked townhouses.

In addition, a “main, very human-scale street” will connect with an oval-shaped park in the middle of the development.

“Obviously, we can’t build 5,000 residential units and five million square feet in one phase. As ambitious as we are, we are looking at this in terms of a phased-in plan,” Salpeter said.

“This is always subject to change; we will adjust based on market conditions.”

It’s the second major Montreal project to be announced in recent months by Cadillac Fairview.

In August, it unveiled plans for a $2.5-billion project to create a new downtown in Anjou, in Montreal’s East end at the proposed terminus of the Blue Line of Montreal’s metro and next to the Galeries d’Anjou mall, which it co-owns with Ivanhoé Cambridge.

It would include a million square feet of office space, 5,000 residential units and a linear park.

https://renx.ca/cadillac-fairview-5m-sq-ft-downtown-montreal-west-island/

https://globalnews.ca/news/7400052/pointe-claire-real-estate-development/?utm_medium=Facebook&utm_source=GlobalMontreal&fbclid=IwAR2lybKO4YCBZ5Ff1lZXYmOyGaJFI_IJZUk9AOfYlraRl73kDk2CpRaiINc

Le voeu de densifier et proposer des pôles d’attraction structurants est louable.

Par contre, architecturalement et urbanistiquement, c’est encore une horreur. Ça n’a aucun charme. C’est impersonnel, massif, parfait pour une vue de mouette mais nous ne sommes pas des mouettes. Ça n’a rien d’humain comme développement, c’est de la bouillie commerciale que les gens ont l’impression de vouloir et de désirer à cause du hype marketing qui l’entoure, mais ces mêmes personnes se rendent compte après quelques années que finalement, c’est froid, générique et tout sauf un milieu de vie, tout sauf un vrai quartier. Pour ça, ça prend un souci du détail et surtout un éclatement du bâti en des centaines de lots et de bâtiments distincts, créés par des architectes distincts, plutôt que quelques dizaines de bâtiments tous imaginés par le même promoteur.

Bref, aucun intérêt architectural.

Je pense aussi que c’est le site d’un boisé. Mais je ne sais pas son intérêt.
Il me semble que ça arrive rarement que de gros ensembles soient organiques et humains. Il manque peut-être une certaine anarchie qui rend les choses agréables pour l’humain.

No plans have been unveiled yet, we have no real idea what it will actually look like. What we do know is it’s one set of developers (CF/IC). Any renderings shown in the articles are almost a decade old. I’d wait to see what the final proposals are before castigating CF for the designs.

I do giggle a bit at the notion that a “unified” approach has no soul; Griffintown is a grouping of projects of from multiple developers and dozens of design teams, and the first thing we complain about is the area’s lack of soul!

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SameGuy a dit : No plans have been unveiled yet, we have no real idea what it will actually look like. What we do know is it’s one set of developers (CF/IC). Any renderings shown in the articles are almost a decade old. I’d wait to see what the final proposals are before castigating CF for the designs.

I do giggle a bit at the notion that a “unified” approach has no soul; Griffintown is a grouping of projects of from multiple developers and dozens of design teams, and the first thing we complain about is the area’s lack of soul!

C’est une observation valide. Mais je pense quand même que Griffintown a vu son développement encadré et uniformisé par son PPU, son nombre restreint de développeurs et aussi sa vitesse de développement.
Bien qu’en bout de ligne, pour développer une âme, je pense que le plus important c’est surtout le temps. J’habite dans un quartier de blocs de béton dans le Mile-End, et je vois une personnalité. Tant qu’on offre la possibilité de mixer les usages, les gens vont occuper la place.

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Je n’ai pas trouvé de fil sur ce projet, si il y doublon je m’en excuse. Voici l’article qui parle de ce futur développement : https://www.mtlblog.com/news/canada/qc/montreal/montreals-west-island-is-getting-its-own-downtown-photos

@AntoineMtl On avait un sujet, j’ai fusionné les discussions :).

vincemtl said: @AntoineMtl On avait un sujet, j’ai fusionné les discussions :).

Merci :slight_smile:

Archie said: Le voeu de densifier et proposer des pôles d’attraction structurants est louable.

Par contre, architecturalement et urbanistiquement, c’est encore une horreur. Ça n’a aucun charme. C’est impersonnel, massif, parfait pour une vue de mouette mais nous ne sommes pas des mouettes. Ça n’a rien d’humain comme développement, c’est de la bouillie commerciale que les gens ont l’impression de vouloir et de désirer à cause du hype marketing qui l’entoure, mais ces mêmes personnes se rendent compte après quelques années que finalement, c’est froid, générique et tout sauf un milieu de vie, tout sauf un vrai quartier. Pour ça, ça prend un souci du détail et surtout un éclatement du bâti en des centaines de lots et de bâtiments distincts, créés par des architectes distincts, plutôt que quelques dizaines de bâtiments tous imaginés par le même promoteur.

Bref, aucun intérêt architectural.

There’s has been no plans unveiled yet. But you get points for the outrage ?

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vincemtl said:

SameGuy a dit : No plans have been unveiled yet, we have no real idea what it will actually look like. What we do know is it’s one set of developers (CF/IC). Any renderings shown in the articles are almost a decade old. I’d wait to see what the final proposals are before castigating CF for the designs.

I do giggle a bit at the notion that a “unified” approach has no soul; Griffintown is a grouping of projects of from multiple developers and dozens of design teams, and the first thing we complain about is the area’s lack of soul!

C’est une observation valide. Mais je pense quand même que Griffintown a vu son développement encadré et uniformisé par son PPU, son nombre restreint de développeurs et aussi sa vitesse de développement.
Bien qu’en bout de ligne, pour développer une âme, je pense que le plus important c’est surtout le temps. J’habite dans un quartier de blocs de béton dans le Mile-End, et je vois une personnalité. Tant qu’on offre la possibilité de mixer les usages, les gens vont occuper la place.

Pointe Claire a un PPU pour le secteur. https://www.pointe-claire.ca/en/city-centre/

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? I think this will be the first time I’ve offered up the SPP’s diagram of a future Fairview “downtown” (with the deprecated Holiday Inn routing of REM) on this site… but I’ve posted it several times elsewhere! ?

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Hey boboy… :s

Citizen groups oppose creating a ‘downtown core’ in West Island

Two large developments will have an adverse effect on everything from rush-hour traffic to the environment, a coalition says.

Author of the article: John Meagher • Montreal Gazette | Publishing date: Oct 29, 2020 • Last Updated 1 day ago • 3 minute readBrivia Group has proposed a high-density residential project in Pointe-Claire at the corner of St-Jean Bvd and Chaucer Ave The developer is looking to build a high-end apartment building Delivery of the project is planned for fall 2022Brivia Group has proposed a high-density residential project in Pointe-Claire, at the corner of St-Jean Bvd. and Chaucer Ave. The developer is looking to build a high-end apartment building. Delivery of the project is planned for fall 2022. Brivia Group

Citizens groups in Pointe-Claire are asking the city to put the brakes on a couple of major development projects slated for the West Island suburb.

Linda De Witt of the Heart of Pointe-Claire citizens coalition says the newly proposed Brivia residential complex on St-Jean Blvd. and the massive Cadillac Fairview mixed-use project next to the Fairview shopping centre will have an adverse effect on everything from rush-hour traffic to the environment.

MONTREAL QUE OCTOBER 16 2020 -- Wooded area bordering the west side of Faiview Ave in Pointe Claire west of Montreal Friday October 16 2020 Cadillac Fairview plans to build a massive development west of Fairview Ave and the Fairview Pointe Claire shopping centre and near the REM station being built nearby John Mahoney MONTREAL GAZETTE ORG XMIT 65156 - 9291Cadillac Fairview plans to build a massive development in Pointe-Claire on land it owns along the Highway 40 service road, near a future REM station being built nearby. PHOTO BY JOHN MAHONEY /Montreal Gazette

De Witt also believes creating a “downtown satellite city” next to the Fairview-Pointe-Claire REM station defeats the purpose of a regional mass transit system.

“The REM was supposed to make mass transit for West Island residents, not to build mass transit and stick 10,000 people at the station, (effectively) creating the station for a population that isn’t there — and making it inaccessible for the population that is there because they’re not going to have any parking.”

The amount of available parking at the Fairview-Pointe Claire and Kirkland stations has yet to be determined. But without a park-and-ride option, De Witt doubts many West Island commuters will be able to use the REM.

“If Kirkland and Fairview have no parking, and the Sources station will have parking for less than 1,000 cars, what good will that do?

“The only way you can get to the station without walking is by bicycle, taxi or bus. When you look at how bus routes are formed, and how the West Island will feed the station, there is no economical way of making mass transportation that would work. They need to have the parking at the station.”

De Witt is also concerned that developing a densely wooded area and wetlands west of the Fairview shopping centre will have an adverse affect on the environment. Cadillac Fairview plans to preserve about two or three hectares on the 20-hectare site.

Pointe-Claire Mayor John Belvedere said both new developments fit with the overall “city centre” masterplan that calls for increased densification in the area around St-Jean Blvd. and Highway 40.

“It’s not 100 per cent my vision. It’s a vision that goes back to 2011 when the city came up with the downtown core (plan).”

Belvedere said the arrival of the REM in 2023 is going to usher change to the West Island.

“Let’s be honest, no one saw the REM coming (a decade ago),” he said. “Everybody was fighting for the Train de L’Ouest to have extra trains on the south side (of the West Island). Then all of a sudden the CDPQ came in with a plan for the REM to come across the West Island. That changed the West Island and Montreal, and you’re going to have to adapt. You have no choice.”

As for the CF project, Belvedere said, “Fairview has been there since 1965. They’ve been a great corporate citizen in Pointe-Claire over the years, and they’ve adapted to the changing times.”

The city also noted on its website that “although this vision corresponds to that identified in the Special Planning Program (SPP) for Pointe-Claire’s city centre, this project must first be submitted to city authorities for review before it can be carried out.”

Belvedere said the city also stands to benefit from increased tax revenues if the project goes forward. “Don’t forget, Montreal takes 50 per cent of our taxes. So we manage the city, and all the services, on half of what we collect.”

Nickie Fournier, is a member of an ad hoc citizens group opposing the proposed Brivia project on the site of the former Mazda dealership. The group has collected more than 1,500 names through an online petition asking the city to halt the high-rise residential project from going forward as is.

Fournier, a longtime Pointe-Claire resident, says she does not share the city’s vision of building a downtown satellite in the suburbs.

“Everyone I talk to is bewildered, astonished, overwhelmed as to what we know as Pointe-Claire,” she said. “I almost fell off my chair when I saw the Fairview one, I’m not kidding.”

She said the increased vehicle traffic and construction from the proposed projects will make even short commutes a headache.

“I chose to live in Pointe-Claire, not downtown…now they’re changing the face of what we are and what we represent.”

Citizen groups oppose creating a ‘downtown core’ in West IslandHonnêtement j’aurais été plus surpris s’il n’y avait pas eu de NIMBYs qui s’opposaient au projet…

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Though I don’t agree with De Witt, the transition between Brivia’s and the adjacent bungalows will be jarring :o

Bon encore des gens en banlieue, qui veulent garder tout de leur ‘‘confort’’ de banlieue et avoir tous les avantages de la ville, sauf qu’ils ne veulent aucun des ‘‘inconvénients’’ qui viennent avec tout projet. Oui le REM va desservir les gens de Pointe-Claire, mais cette ville n’est pas un village perdu entouré de champs et de forêts… le West-Island va se densifier, c’est pas Ste-Martine ou Ste-Sophie ici…

De plus, avoir un grosse infrastructure de transport, c’est accepté que le développement se fasse autour. Cette résidente devrait le réaliser et comprendre pourquoi on a pas un station de métro en plein milieu de Ste-Julie ou de Delson… De plus, ce secteur a toujours été très fréquenté dû au centre commercial et au terminus de bus, donc il faut pas se surprendre que le modèle évolue et se densifie.

Les noeuds de transport attire le développement, et cette formule est beaucoup mieux, que de juste développer d’autre développement insipide en bordure du périmètre urbanisé, comme ont n’arrête pas de faire autour de Montréal, et ensuite demander que le transport s’y rende… (Dix30/Solar)

Encore des allergiques au développement… Avoir un métro sans vouloir se densifier c’est complètement ridicule. Ils ne sont pas seuls à avoir cette mentalité. Elle est répandue un peu partout sur l’ile de Montréal.

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Il est absolument primordial que ce développement prenne place sur l’océan de stationnement qu’est actuellement le centre commercial Fairview et non sur le boisé à l’ouest qui a depuis longtemps été sous le viseur des promoteurs et des industries qui jalonnent les bordures de l’autoroute 40. Si le développement prévu est sur la stationnement, je le supporte complètement. S’il vise le boisé, je me range fermement dans le camp des réactionnaires NIMBY de mon West Island natal (mais absolument pas pour les mêmes raisons).

Le problème avec le redéveloppement de ces grandes propriétés commerciales (je crois que le secteur Fairview doit bien faire la taille de Griffintown-Ouest au grand complet), c’est que le rapport de force entre le promoteur et la municipalité est complètement déséquilibré. Un tel “suburban retrofit” doit venir des pouvoirs publics et non pas des promoteurs qui ne peuvent y prévoir adéquatement les équipements collectifs et récréatifs nécessaires à un réel milieu mixte.

C’est l’une de nombreuses conséquences tragiques des défusions: les municipalités défusionnés du West Island n’ont absolument pas les moyens et les ressources de se consacrer à une planification proactive de leur territoire, laissant aux Cadillac Fairview de ce monde le soin de proposer des redéveloppements titanesques et mal-pensés. Le PPU de Pointe-Claire n’a probablement pas les moyens de sa propre mise en oeuvre et c’est normal: le redéveloppement d’un tel morceau de territoire est une affaire de métropole (ou de communauté métropolitaine), pas de petite ville de banlieue.

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Tant le PPU que la proposition de CF prévoit de bâtir sur le boisé.