Refonte du réseau bus

La ligne à vocation industrielle. C’est quoi son numéro?

C’est vraiment triste l’approche des media ici. C’est 95% que du négatif car il croit que c’est ce qui rapportent de l’argents. Ça m’arrive parfois de regarder des media français, ce n’est pas plus équilibré, le contenu est plus élaboré et leur côté d’écoute et mieux qu’ici.

1 Like

C’est les nouveaux lignes d’autobus 101 Saint-Patrick et 190 Norman (bientôt anciennement 116 Lafleur/Norman), selon la carte de la refonte dans la présentation PowerPoint sur Plus de quartiers connectés (p. 10) suivie les lignes en rose.

1 Like
2 Likes

Donc les nouvelles lignes sont la 38 114 190 et 198
La 715 renuméroter 50
La 15, 58 109 406 abolie
Le reste est modifié a peu près

An ode to the No. 15 bus as it reaches the end of the line

Route along Ste-Catherine St. played a memorable role in my childhood as I developed my lifelong affection for downtown Montreal.


The Great Antonio pulls the No. 15 bus along Ste-Catherine St. in 1978. “Did those bus passengers complain about the delay? Certainly not,” writes Deegan Charles Stubbs. Photo by Arne Glassbourg/Montreal Gazette

The decision this week by the Société de transport de Montréal to discontinue service on the No. 15 bus route along downtown Ste-Catherine St. left me saddened. Perhaps that word’s a bit too strong, but the announcement did tug at some nostalgic childhood heart strings. The 15 and I go a long way back.

Considering this cessation from a logical viewpoint, I fully understand the STM dropping a bus route that essentially mirrors aboveground the métro’s subterranean Green Line. In fact, I think it fair to say the No. 15 had been living on borrowed time since the opening of the métro almost 60 years ago.

Mind you, the bus did stop more frequently than the métro, providing those travelling from Atwater Ave. to, say, the corner of St-Marc and Ste-Catherine Sts. — particularly those with limited mobility — a more convenient option than backtracking from the Guy-Concordia métro station. Hopefully, the end of the line for the 15 route will allow for better service on other lines.

Read more

Why the feelings of nostalgia? I spent my childhood living beside Westmount Park (indeed, I’m still here). In those days, perhaps paradoxically, the park, now usually chock-a-block with kids, was deserted during the dog days of summer as most of my contemporaries went away on family vacations or to one of a vast array of camps.

Not being a child disposed to roughing it, I preferred to stay in the city. Therefore, in an attempt to get my nose out of the book I was reading, my mother would equip me with the princely sum of, if memory serves me correctly, eight cents. The coins didn’t stay in my pocket long: I would take the No. 78 bus — alas, also to be retired — to Atwater and then transfer to the 15 en route downtown.

This journey provided a grand view of what was then, one of, if not the, most vibrant streets in the city. I’d ride good old No. 15 to the downtown core, maybe University St., then begin my leisurely stroll back home. The return journey was far from a direct route as I would stop at countless record and book stores along the way, casually window shopping while enjoying the scenery. Without doubt, the métro would have been a faster mode of transport, but I was in no rush.

Many of the riders on the 15 seemed to share my lack of urgency; the thinking seemed to be: if you’re in a hurry, take the métro.

Imagine the horror if today, a very large man with very long hair, toting large chains, stood in front of the bus, blocking its progress. This happened on numerous occasions. The man would ask the driver to turn off the engine and put the transmission into neutral while he attached his chains to the front bumper. He then proceeded to pull the bus, passengers and all, along Ste-Catherine for a block or so. After his feat of strength, he then approached the usually large group of spectators that had assembled on the sidewalk and passed his hat.

Did those bus passengers complain about the delay caused by the Great Antonio? Certainly not. If anything, it was deemed an honour to have been part of the act by this Montreal icon, an eccentric wrestler/strongman whose family name was Barichievich.

No doubt some will say it may be silly to lament the loss of a bus route and fully understand the STM’s decision to retire it. Yet I can’t help but experience a small sense of loss as yet another, albeit minor, aspect of my downtown Montreal will disappear.

So a thank you to good old No. 15 and those who drove it (and at least one who pulled it) for playing a small role in my childhood, as I developed my lifelong affection for downtown Montreal.

Deegan Charles Stubbs is a writer in Westmount.

4 Likes

Source:

News

June 10 2024

The clientele is inviting the customers to an open house on Tuesday, June 11, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Cégep André-Laurendeau, located at 1111 Lapierre Street in LaSalle.

Email

Share

Tweet

Montréal, June 10, 2024 – Following the recent announcement of new bus routes in the greater Sud-Ouest area, more specifically in Lachine and LaSalle, the STM is inviting customers to an open house on Tuesday, June 11, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Cégep André-Laurendeau, located at 1111 Lapierre Street in LaSalle.

The open house will give members of the public the opportunity to learn more about the new bus service. Representatives from the STM will be available to answer any questions. Residents interested in attending can register here. For those unable to attend, the STM will also have an information booth at Lachine’s community festival, Fêtes de Lachine, on August 17.

A location-based information campaign is currently underway in both boroughs to familiarize residents with the new service. Through online and social media ads and posters on buses and in the métro, the campaign invites customers to use a special trip planner to explore the new routes.

The trip planner will compare old and new routes and recommend itineraries to help customers prepare for the changes set to come into effect on August 26. The STM is encouraging customers to go to to explore the tool and familiarize themselves with the new bus routes.

Additionally, the STM is updating its bus stop signage to reflect the new routes and is planning to have representatives on the ground during the first few weeks to inform customers of the changes.

  • 30 -

medias@stm.info

Une petite idée des nouveaux arrêts d’autobus dans le Sud-Ouest. Des stationnements tarifiés sont retirés pour les arrêts

  • De retirer 11 espaces de stationnement tarifés sur la rue Allard, entre la rue Beaulieu et le boulevard Monk;
  • De retirer 2 espaces de stationnement tarifés sur la rue Notre-Dame Ouest, entre les rues Charlevoix et Vinet;
  • De retirer 3 espaces de stationnement tarifés sur la rue Notre-Dame Ouest, entre les rues Murray et Peel;;
2 Likes

Un public nombreux s’est retrouvé le 11 juin à la salle des Pas perdus au Cégep André-Laurendeau à LaSalle pour la soirée portes ouvertes organisée par la STM sur la refonte du réseau de bus. Des citoyennes et des citoyens de Lachine et surtout de LaSalle sont venus rencontrer les experts pour trouver des réponses à leurs questions nombreuses. Des élus et élues des deux arrondissements, parmi lesquels se trouvait les mairesses de LaSalle et de Lachine, Nancy Blanchet et Maja Vodanović, avaient également répondu à l’invitation de la STM.
[…]
S’exprimant devant le public présent, Sébastien Gagné, Conseiller corporatif – Développement des réseaux de la STM a précisé que des ajustements seront apportés au nouveau plan dont le lancement est prévu pour le 26 août.

J’entends d’ici les cris de panique chez Joe Beef.

8 Likes

:joy: :joy: :joy:

Press release

June 18 2024

Open house on Thursday, June 20, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Comité d’éducation aux adultes de la Petite-Bourgogne et de Saint-Henri (CÉDA),

Email

Share

Tweet

Montréal, June 18, 2024 – Following the recent announcement of the new bus service in the greater Sud-Ouest area, more specifically in Sud-Ouest, Verdun and Ville-Marie-Sud, the STM is inviting customers to an open house on Thursday, June 20, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Comité d’éducation aux adultes de la Petite-Bourgogne et de Saint-Henri (CÉDA), located at 2515 Delisle Street in Montréal (near Lionel-Groulx métro station).

The open house will give members of the public the opportunity to learn more about the new bus service. Representatives from the STM will be available to answer any questions. Residents interested in attending can register here. For those unable to attend, the STM will also have an information booth near De l’Église métro station during the July 20 event celebrating the start of car-free season on Promenade Wellington.

A location-based information campaign is currently underway in the boroughs to familiarize residents with the new service. Through online and social media ads and posters on buses and in the métro, the campaign invites customers to use a special trip planner to explore the new routes.

The trip planner will compare old and new routes and recommend itineraries to help customers prepare for the changes set to come into effect on August 26. The STM is encouraging customers to go to explore the tool and familiarize themselves with the new bus routes.

Additionally, the STM is updating its bus stop signage to reflect the new routes and is planning to have representatives on the ground during the first few weeks to inform customers of the changes.

I went to the open house of the bus redesign (as I’ll be a future resident of Verdun soon!), and I learned a bit how they plan their redesigns.

  • I asked them several times about the bus stop spacing, and they said their goal eventually is to remove stops for frequent bus lines, as people get on and off at every stop, and keep the stop spacing the same as it is now for “local” infrequent bus lines. They said they might not have the exact bus spacing they want with the redesign now, but eventually they plan to remove stops to speed up travel times (depending on budget, as they have to move bus shelters).

  • They also told me how with the REM coming, they’ve had to speed up their bus redesigns. In NYC, they give the maps of their redesign a year in advance. I asked when the next section of the redesign for the West Island would be completed, and they told me it’s still being worked on so they’re not sure. Essentially, they’re working on several redesigns now because of the REM, and would like to spend more time on the redesigns but don’t have the time. After West Island is Côte-des-Neiges/TMR/Westmount which will be also be the “sped up” redesign. This means it won’t be to the quality of changes that they want, such as reduction in bus stops.

  • There are eventual plans on combining multiple routes to create “frequent corridors” as I’m calling it. They didn’t give me any more info but just told me that is a plan.

  • The STM wants MTQ to make a new bus only exit at the Saint-Pierre interchange to connect to rue Victoria when the interchange will be redone (at some point). They talked with MTQ several years ago about this, but never heard back from them and haven’t received any updates.

  • There might be plans at some point for a bus to connect between Angrignon and Concordia Loyola Campus/Côte-Saint-Luc, if there is demand for it. In their studies they found not many people drove between these areas or took transit, although they said that could be because there is a singular road and a literal cliff preventing people from travelling between these two places

  • If you look at the Verdun area, you’ll notice there is a bus on almost every street (north/south). They didn’t want this and wanted to just use one or two buses that would be frequent, but residences and specific people kept pushing this so now we have buses on every street as is the case now…

  • I asked about a bus lane on rue Wellington around rue Bridge which gets regularly backed up during rush hour. They said how the city plans to make rue des Irlandais and pont Victoria connected as one street, so rue bridge wouldn’t be a main road used to get onto the bridge (cars would go via Bonaventure expressway). I knew the city was doing this, but hoped there would be a shorter term solution. I hope they plan to make this change soon.

Several of the people I talked to mentioned @coledev’s work as I mentioned the bus stop signs, it’s great hearing people at the STM know of the work we are doing.

20 Likes

Ce matin, j’ai croisé une équipe de la STM en train de casser le béton du trottoir à côté du Pavillon A de l’ÉTS pour installer un poteau pour un futur arrêt sur Notre-Dame Ouest. D’ailleurs il y a plusieurs panneaux rouges de la STM sur Notre-Dame Ouest entre Peel et Guy indiquant « nouvel arrêt ou arrêt déplacé à partir du 26 août »

2 Likes

À Lachine :

4 Likes